With the news that Saturday May 9th is unofficially National Buckfast Day, (seriously is there anything without a national celebration). A Buckfast appreciation Facebook page has garnered more than 23000 likes.

The potent wine (15% per cent) is loved and loathed in equal measure by opposite ends of the social spectrum but did you know in the 1970’s it was originally marketed towards bored housewives?

Here are a few other things you might not know about Glasgow’s favourite “commotion lotion”.

14. Origins

In the 1920’s Buckfast’s original motto was, “drink three small glasses a day for good health and lively blood”. it also contains the same amount of caffeine as 8 cans of coke.

13. Brand recognition

It has not been marketed or advertised in Scotland for more than 20 years.

12. Divine intervention

Helen Liddell, Baroness of Coatdyke, was previously an M.P for Monklands and subsequently Airdrie. She fought a crusade against Buckfast in the 1990’s, threatening to write a letter to the Pope, if the Benedictine Monks refused to take action, and attempt to halt anti social behaviour resulting from alleged Buckfast consumption.

11. Charitable Causes

The current turnover by J Chandler (responsible for selling the fortified wine) was £38.3 million pounds last year and the Benedictine monks regularly give profits to charity.

10. 6 million and counting

6 million bottles of the 15% per cent wine are sold annually.

9. Scotland’s adopted…national drink.

Scotland alone consumes half the entire sales of Buckfast worldwide.

8. Tried and Tested

It has been manufactured the same way for more than 90 years.

7. Foreign appeal

It is popular in Australia, and in the Caribbean many consider the drink an aphrodisiac.

6. Small fish in big pond

 

Buckfast currently accounts for less than 1% per cent of total sales in the drinks industry.

5. Infamy

The green coloured bottle is so notorious it appeared in an episode of the Simpsons, with Groundskeeper Willie, (the Scottish guy) seen drinking it on school grounds and singing whilst inebriated.

4. It was a simpler time

In the 1920’s it was promoted as curing everything from depression, lassitude (mental weariness) and even exhaustion. (No wonder with all the caffeine.)

3. Worldwide recognition

In 2010 The New York Times published a story regarding the consumption of Buckfast in Scotland.

2. Thirsty

It is said that nearly 10% per cent of the total worldwide sales of Buckfast occur in the Buckfast triangle. An area between Coatbridge, Airdrie and Cumbernauld. Reports have ranged from 8% per cent to 80 % percent of total worldwide sales occurring in this area.

1. Apology

In 2014 Police Scotland were forced to apologise to J Chandler & Co after it was deemed the authorities unfairly targeted the drink and were trying to pressurise certain shops from selling it.